W9FE'S

BASIC DMR INFO PAGE


Catch me on the Illinois-Link DMR Talkgroup 31171

 

 

NEW TO DMR?

LEARN THE BASICS FIRST!

 


REQUIRED FIRST STEP: GET A DMR ID  

Click here or on the Picture to apply for a DMR ID at RadioID.net.

YOU MUST HAVE A DMR ID BEFORE TRANSMITTING ON DMR NETWORKS!

 

Introduction to DMR DMR Etiquette & Common Courtesy Video-How to Write a DMR Codeplug Video-How to Write a HotSpot Codeplug
 

DMR Codeplug Programming Example

 

 

DMR ETIQUETTE

and COMMON COURTESY

 

REMEMBER:...PARROT IS YOUR DMR FRIEND

 

Instead of constantly asking for radio checks on populated DMR talkgroups like you were still on CB...Take advantage of the Parrot talkgroup (Group call on Repeater TG9998 or Private call on Brandmeister TG9990) to check your audio. It will echo back your audio test when you transmit to it.

Announce your Talkgroup when announcing your availability or calling another station. Some users may be scanning or have a radio without a display. (e.g. "This is W9FE listening on North America" or when identifying during your QSO, say "W1ABC, This is W9FE on TAC 310".)

Avoid calling CQ. DMR is not HF. Operating DMR on the network is not DXing. If you desire a contact, Just say something like, "This is W9FE listening on North America"

Move to a more localized talkgroup when connecting with someone on a Wide Area Talkgroup (e.g. Worldwide, Nationwide, Regionwide, or Statewide) or keep your QSO's short. You will be tying up hundreds of repeaters on Wide Area Talkgroups. Consider moving to a TAC channel for longer QSO's

Listen...Listen...Listen. Spend most of your time Listening..not talking. Allow 180 Seconds before transmitting when first joining a talkgroup. This will avoid calling over a QSO transmission in progress that your radio has not yet unsquelched. Many people have their Time Out Timer (TOT) set to 180s and your radio will not unsquelch a transmission already in progress on the talkgroup until they actually unkey.

Allow several seconds of Pause between transmissions. This will allow users with hotspots to disconnect from the talkgroup or allow others to join. Quick keying during your QSO is inconsiderate.

and once again...Use Parrot to test your audio instead of on populated talkgroups

You will occasionally see some user ID's appear momentarily. "Kerchunking" on DMR repeaters is necessary for them to hear the PTT talkgroups or those with hotspots to change talkgoups. Don't assume that they are looking for you to contact them. Many times they are commanding things up so they can listen.

 

 

DMR SIMPLEX VOICE FREQUENCIES

 

441.000 446.500 446.075 Most Common NA 433.450 Most Common Non-NA
145.790 145.510

TG=Talkgroup 99

CC=Color Code 1

TS=Time Slot 1

Admit Criteria: Always

In-Call Criteria: TX or Always

IMPORTANT: *DO NOT USE 146.520 or 446.000 Mhz as they are National Analog Simplex calling channels. Also avoid repeater input or output channels, locally used Non-DMR simplex channels, satellite sub-bands, and any other frequencies that could disrupt amateur communications

 

 

animated arrow  Need a DMR Codeplug for our St. Louis Area DMR repeaters?

 

ST Louis Area DMR Info and Area Codeplugs

 

NOTE: These codeplugs listed are NoCall / NoID codeplugs...you will need to enter in your callsign and DMR ID into them using your Codeplug Programming Software (CPS) prior to importing into your radio. NOTE: YOU MUST HAVE A DMR ID BEFORE TRANSMITTING ON DMR NETWORKS!


K0MDG/R Codeplugs-TYT MD380 K7QLL/R Codeplug-TYT MD380 WS9IDG/R Codeplug-TYT MD380
KM0MDG/R Codeplugs-AT868UV K7QLL/R Codeplug-AT868UV WS9IDG/R Codeplug-AT868UV
KM0MDG/R Codeplugs-CS800D
 

IMPORTANT NOTE: It is imperitive to utilize a more localized talkgroup when connecting with someone on the St. Louis Area DMR Repeaters or keep your QSO's short. You will be tying up hundreds of repeaters on Wide Area Talkgroups that are Nationwide, Regional, and Statewide Talkgroups. Use these as calling talkgroups and consider moving to a TAC channel for longer QSO's. This is common DMR courtesy for everyone to adhere to.

KM0MDG/R Repeater website - St. Louis, MO

K7QLL DMR Repeater website - Greenville, IL

WS9IDG DMR Repeaterbook listing - Shiloh, IL

 

Have a Hotspot or Openspot?

 

 

How to Write a HotSpot Codeplug US Talkgroups Import File-csv

 

 

No Repeater codeplug setup is needed if you're using a Hotspot. Download a Basic Brandmeister Starter Codeplug for use on the Brandmeister Network.

If you want to combine the St. Louis Area DMR Repeaters into your Hotspot Codeplug, Download the US Wide Brandmeister w/STL Area Repeaters Codeplug

 
Basic Brandmeister Starter Codeplug-AT868UV US Wide Brandmeister w/STL Area Repeaters Codeplug-AT868UV
Basic Brandmeister Starter Codeplug-TYT MD380 US Wide Brandmeister w/STL Area Repeaters Codeplug-TYT MD380
 

Click to Listen to USA Nationwide (TG3100) on the Brandmeister Network.

Click to Listen to TAC-310 (TG310) on the Brandmeister Network.

 

 

Take Your Hotspot/Openspot Portable Shark RF Openspot - DMR to Fusion Crossmode Setup
 
APRS Setup on TYT MD380/390 w/GPS
 

 

Need help organizing your DMR Zones and Channel List?  Here's my DMR Zone setup.

Feel free to organize your Zones and Channel List similar to mine or create your own personalized setup

File can be downloaded in either PDF or Excel formats

W9FE DMR Zone Listing.pdf W9FE DMR Zone Listing.xls
 

 

N0GSG DMR Contact Manager Software

Using a different radio than what is listed?  You can also import these codeplugs into your current DMR radio codeplug that you are using with the N0GSG DMR Contact Manager Software.  Contact Manager allows Codeplug data to be easily moved between different radio types using the Structural Import feature.   Just open an empty codeplug file saved from your radio (e.g. Anytone 868UV) then select the Structural Import tab and import from the codeplug from another radio file (e.g. TYT MD-380). IMPORTANT: For use with AnyTone models, use the Anytone CPS Tool->Export Data Conversion File command to produce a DCF file readable by Contact Manager.

 

SUGGESTED HOTSPOT FREQUENCIES

redballIllinois Repeater Association Band Plan-2006

Have a DMR Hotspot?  Set your DMR Hotspot to one of the Auxiliary Repeater Links below

 

 

Avoid Repeater inputs & Satellite Uplink frequencies

animated arrowARRL NEWS - DMR Hotspots & Interference with Satellite Uplinks

 

ARRL BAND PLAN

redballAuxiliary Repeater Links 433-435

Auxiliary and Control Links, Repeaters, and Simplex (Local Option) 445-447

redballIN THE U.S.: Part of the 70cm band (433.00 - 435.00 MHz) is reserved for "Auxiliary Repeater Links" (your OpenSPOT fits this definition well enough.) IT IS UP TO YOU TO MAKE SURE A FREQUENCY IS NOT ALREADY IN USE BEFORE YOU BEGIN USING IT WITH YOUR OPENSPOT !!! If you cause interference with someone else's equipment, there is no excuse for not trying a different frequency! You might want to check with your area's Frequency Coordinator.

redballA second block within the 70cm band (445.00 - 447.00 MHz) is reserved for "Auxiliary and Control Links, Repeaters, and Simplex (Local Option)". Again, your OpenSPOT is a good fit, here. AGAIN - IT IS UP TO YOU TO MAKE SURE A FREQUENCY IS NOT ALREADY IN USE BEFORE YOU BEGIN USING IT WITH YOUR OPENSPOT !!! It bears repeating - you might want to check with your area's Frequency Coordinator.

redballIt is recommended that you check with your local Frequency Coordinator before selecting a frequency, and at the very least, set a UHF ANALOG radio to a frequency of interest, in VFO simplex mode. Then turn up the volume, and just listen for a couple hours as you go about your day. If you don't hear anything (voice, digital screeching, or other obvious traffic), you might be able to use that frequency. If you hear anything, set VFO to a different frequency and listen again for a couple hours. (With so many frequencies to choose from, if you pick something in the middle of the pack, you'll likely get lucky on the first try.)

Source: Shark RF Openspot Community Forum

 

The Illinois Repeater Association (ILRA.net) lists the following Band Plan for Auxiliary Link Frequencies:

blueball433.0250 - 434.9750 FM Auxiliary Links

blueball445.000 445.875 FM Repeater Inputs/Auxiliary Links

blueball446.050 446.375 FM Repeater Inputs/Auxiliary Links

blueball446.5250 446.9750 FM Auxiliary Links

 

RECOMMENDED HOTSPOT FREQUENCIES

SET YOUR HOTSPOT TO A SUGGESTED CLEAR Auxiliary Link Band Plan Channel BELOW

 

blueball433.0250 - 434.9750 FM Auxiliary Links

25 kHz Spacing

Note: These link channels have primary allocation status.

433.025 433.050 433.075
433.100 433.125 433.150 433.175
433.200 433.225 433.250 433.275
433.300 433.325 433.350 433.375
433.400 433.425 433.450 433.475
433.500 433.525 433.550 433.575
433.600 433.625 433.650 433.675
433.700 433.725 433.750 433.775
433.800 433.825 433.850 433.875
433.900 433.925 433.950 433.975
434.000 434.425 434.450 434.475
434.500 434.525 434.550 434.575
434.600 434.625 434.650 434.675
434.700 434.725 434.750 434.775
434.800 434.825 434.850 434.875
434.900 434.925 434.950 434.975

 

 

blueball445.000 445.875 FM Repeater Inputs/Auxiliary Links

25 kHz Spacing

Note: May be issued as Paired or Individual Channels

445.000 445.025 445.050 445.075
445.100 445.125 445.150 445.175
445.200 445.225 445.250 445.275
445.300 445.325 445.350 445.375
445.400 445.425 445.450 445.475
445.500 445.525 445.550 445.575
445.600 445.625 445.650 445.675
445.700 445.725 445.750 445.775
445.800 445.825 445.850 445.875

 

 

blueball446.050 446.375 FM Repeater Inputs/Auxiliary Links

25 kHz Spacing

Note: May be issued as Paired or Individual Channels

Blue/Yellow = Non-Paired Channels

446.050 446.075
446.100 446.125 446.150 446.175
446.200 446.225 446.250 446.275
446.300 446.325 446.350 446.375

 

 

blueball446.5250 446.9750 FM Auxiliary Links

25 kHz Spacing

Note: May be issued as Paired or Individual Channels

446.525 446.550 446.575
446.600 446.625 446.650 446.675
446.700 446.725 446.750 446.775
446.800 446.825 446.850 446.875
446.900 446.925 446.950 446.975

 

IMPORTANT: *DO NOT USE 446.000 Mhz as it is a National Analog Simplex calling channel. Also avoid repeater input or output channels, locally used Non-DMR simplex channels, satellite sub-bands, and any other frequencies that could disrupt amateur communications

 

 

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